Create a link to a UWP app to run as administrator

I’m a console enthusiast. I used to work with cmder over the last years. In general I was pretty happy. But the announcement of the Windows Terminal really caught my attention.One thing that annoyed me is the disabled checkbox, when creating a link, that does not allow to have it automatically prompt for elevation.So here is my work around. Open windows explorer and enter shell:AppsFolder into the address bar to open the apps folder:Drag‘n’drop the Windows Terminal to any folder.Now patch the lnk-file: Create another lnk file pointing to cmd {path to the first lnk file}, running minimized and having a nice icon.Now just use the second lnk file and it works as expected.Windows Terminal, PowerShell 6 and oh-my-posh up and running.

Totally automated Team Foundation 2017 build agent setup

First of all set the default TLS Version for .net to 1.2: With Chocolatey a lot of things are easy to set up:Visual Studio 2017 CommunityWindows Installer XML ToolsetVisual Studio CodeGitVersionNodeJsPython2Remote Server Administration ToolsNow let's modify visual studio and add some components, so that the node-gyp can compile popular packages. We could have used the windows build tools but they default to VS 2015 and the install location of python cannot be adjusted. Visual Studio C++ core features Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.VC.CoreIdeWindows Universal C RuntimeMicrosoft.VisualStudio.Component.Windows10SDKWindows 10 SDK (10.0.16299.0) for Desktop C++ [x86 and x64]Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.Windows10SDK.16299.DesktopVC++ 2017 v141 toolset (x86,x64)Microsoft.VisualStudio.Component.VC.Tools.x86.x64We will also utilize code generation using T4:Text Template TransformationMicrosoft.VisualStudio.Component.TextTemplatingThe new MsBuild Project  SDKs requires the installation of .NET Core components of Visual Studio. Otherwise you’ll receive errors like “Error MSB4236: The SDK 'Microsoft.NET.Sdk' specified could not be found.”. Additionally we will add the .NET Framework targeting packs to build against several frameworks:.NET Core runtimeMicrosoft.Component.NetFX.Core.RuntimeMicrosoft.Net.Core.Component.SDK.NET Core 2.0 development toolsMicrosoft.NetCore.ComponentGroup.DevelopmentTools.NET Core 2.0 development toolsThe next issues arise: Visual Studio installer is lacking the –wait argument on the command line. So we need to start it as a new process and wait: Next update Visual Studio to its latest version: For Windows Installer XML Toolset we also want the Wix Toolset Visual Studio 2017 Extension to be installed. So we download the latest version from the Visual Studio Marketplace and install it silently: For python we need to add the install location to the path variable:Using NPM we nee to install the following packages globally:Node.js native addon build toolNode SassGulp And finally all together - the final script: HTH

W3C Server Timing Header and API

I used custom headers in the past to send some metrics over to the client–mostly for debugging purposes to quickly differentiate between client and server issues on slow web request and/or web application performance.While that was working out pretty well I like standards and even if I did not tell anybody I always wanted such a thing built into HTTP.A W3C standard is on the way: Server TimingIt consists of a spec how the HTTP Header is constructed: And a client side API for JavaScript: Of course not all browsers support it yetBut Chrome 65–at the time of writing in the beta channel–does so:Even without any extra JavaScript you can inspect the numbers sent with the header in the Network tab of the DevTools:

Junctions with PowerShell

Junctions are really useful. It pretty easy to create them inside a command shell on windows: But as it is a command inside cmd.exe and not a executable you cannot use mklink from PowerShell without calling cmd.exe BUT: the New-Item cmdlet supports options to achieve the same since Windows Management Framework v.5.